Overcoming Obstacles to Advanced Air Sealing

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Overcoming Obstacles to Advanced Air Sealing

We all know the basics of energy efficiency. Air seal high in the building, then low, then insulate. Seems simple, right? Stop the air from leaking into or out of the building. Save money. Increase ...

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Wrap It Up: Building Houses with the Skin on the Outside

November 01, 1999

Most techniques for creating a tight building envelope in residential construction focus on how to create a continuous air barrier on the interior of the building's frame. [continue reading]

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Calculating Whole Wall R-Values on the Net

November 01, 1999

In 1995, approximately 85% of U.S. residential housing was stick built. While energy-efficient walls can be built with dimensional lumber, it takes careful design and construction to achieve this. [continue reading]

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Unventing Attics In Cold Climates

November 01, 1999

As Home Energy readers know, venting attics in hot, humid climates brings a great deal of moisture into the structure (see "Conditioned Attics Save Energy in Hot Climates," HE May/June '97, p. 6). Not venting the attic avoids this problem. [continue reading]

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New Value for High-Mass Walls

Author: Jan Kosny
September 01, 1999

In certain climates, construction of massive building envelopes--such as concrete, earth, and insulating concrete forms (ICFs)--can be one of the most effective ways of reducing building heating and cooling loads. [continue reading]

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Hot Topics Covered at Thermal VII Conference

Author: Don Otto
May 01, 1999

Thermal Performance of the Exterior Envelopes of Buildings is unique in that it gives equal recognition to the principles and the practical applications of building science research. All of the presentations at this conference, in fact, are assigned to one of two parallel tracks--Principles or Practices. [continue reading]

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Handling Framing Details in High-Performance Homes

Author: John Tooley
May 01, 1999

The location and installed integrity of the 3C barrier will dictate the comfort, health, and safety of the home's occupants; the durability of the structure; and the amount of energy required to heat and cool the home. [continue reading]

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Building Performance Journal Editors

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Is Energy Efficiency an American Value?

Jim Gunshinan

Is Energy Efficiency an American Value?

Energy efficiency is good for the economy, good for families, good for workers, and good for the environment.

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