Air-Sealing Tips for Efficiency That Lasts // Part 4: Protect Your Air Barrier

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Air-Sealing Tips for Efficiency That Lasts // Part 4: Protect Your Air Barrier

This is part 4 of a series that describes how to air seal the most difficult parts of buildings. A service cavity and vented rainscreen promote durable airtightness.

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Air Sealing in Occupied Homes

Author: David Keefe
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November 01, 1995

There are few areas of residential construction that are so commonly misunderstood as air movement within and through houses. [continue reading]

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Assessing The Integrity Of Electrical Wiring

Author: Larry Kinney
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September 01, 1995

Dense-pack cellulose insulation is a very useful and cost-effective technique for lowering both conductive and convective heat losses in a variety of housing types. [continue reading]

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Air Sealing in Low-Rise Buildings

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September 01, 1995

Multifamily buildings vary widely. They range from houses divided into three apartments to 500-unit high rises. So a weatherization project must be tailored to fit the personality of the building. [continue reading]

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Selecting Windows for Energy Efficiency

archive CONTENT
July 01, 1995

An understanding of some basic energy concepts is essential to choosing appropriate windows and skylights. [continue reading]

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Urethane Foams and Air Leakage Control

archive CONTENT
July 01, 1995

Urethane foams can make a major contribution to improving the energy efficiency of buildings when they are used as an air leakage control material or as a component of an air barrier system. [continue reading]

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Moisture and Mobile Home Weatherization

archive CONTENT
July 01, 1995

Most newer manufactured homes in the Pacific Northwest, as well as many older mobile homes, have a vapor retarder on the inside of the wall cavity--typically right behind the gypsum board. However, many older mobile homes, especially those built before the 1980s, were manufactured with a vapor retarder on the outside of the wall cavity--generally right behind the metal (or sometimes wood) siding. [continue reading]

How We Turned Our House into a Giant Foam Box, Part I by Wen Lee

Leslie Jackson

How We Turned Our House into a Giant Foam Box, Part I by Wen Lee

Chris Stratton and Wen Lee are a husband-and-wife team living in the Los Angeles area who are DIY converting their ...

From Philly to DC: Join Us on Capitol Hill

Keith Aldridge

From Philly to DC: Join Us on Capitol Hill

By now you have probably heard – as part of this year’s HPC National Home Performance Conference & Trade ...

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