Selling Comfort and Providing Energy Efficiency

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Selling Comfort and Providing Energy Efficiency

On a mission to help people make homes more energy efficient? So are we. Indow sells and installs interior window inserts in homes that help homeowners stay warmer in the winter and cooler in ...

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Assessing The Integrity Of Electrical Wiring

Author: Larry Kinney
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September 01, 1995

Dense-pack cellulose insulation is a very useful and cost-effective technique for lowering both conductive and convective heat losses in a variety of housing types. [continue reading]

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Air Sealing in Low-Rise Buildings

archive CONTENT
September 01, 1995

Multifamily buildings vary widely. They range from houses divided into three apartments to 500-unit high rises. So a weatherization project must be tailored to fit the personality of the building. [continue reading]

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Selecting Windows for Energy Efficiency

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July 01, 1995

An understanding of some basic energy concepts is essential to choosing appropriate windows and skylights. [continue reading]

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Urethane Foams and Air Leakage Control

archive CONTENT
July 01, 1995

Urethane foams can make a major contribution to improving the energy efficiency of buildings when they are used as an air leakage control material or as a component of an air barrier system. [continue reading]

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Moisture and Mobile Home Weatherization

archive CONTENT
July 01, 1995

Most newer manufactured homes in the Pacific Northwest, as well as many older mobile homes, have a vapor retarder on the inside of the wall cavity--typically right behind the gypsum board. However, many older mobile homes, especially those built before the 1980s, were manufactured with a vapor retarder on the outside of the wall cavity--generally right behind the metal (or sometimes wood) siding. [continue reading]

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Is an R-19 Wall Really R-19?

Author: Leo Rainer
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March 01, 1995

Just because a wall has R-19 insulation in it does not mean it's an R-19 wall. Using the R-value of the insulation between the studs (the "cavity R-value") as an overall wall R-value is similar to using the center-of-glass value for a window--it ignores the effect of framing. [continue reading]

Healthy Homes and a Healthy Bottom Line

Jim Gunshinan

Healthy Homes and a Healthy Bottom Line

There has been a lot of interest of late in the weatherization and broader home performance community in putting a ...

Side Benefits of a Passive House

Rob Nicely

Side Benefits of a Passive House

There’s no doubt that building to Passive House standards results in energy consumption that’s about 70 to 80 ...

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